[Answer] As mentioned in the lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” a rampart is a what?

As mentioned in the lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” a rampart is a what?

“The Star-Spangled Banner” started as a poem, written by Francis Scott Key during the War of 1812. The stanzas recount the British attack on Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore in 1814. It’s a song you have heard countless times – and you can probably recite it by heart. But do you know what the words mean? The line “Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro’ the perilous fight, O’er the ramparts we watch’d, were so gallantly streaming” suggests that the stars and stripes of the US flag could be seen over the ramparts despite the bombardment of the British warships. A rampart is a barricade built to protect a castle or fort, such as Fort McHenry in this case.

[Answer] As mentioned in the lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” a rampart is a what?

Never has more attention been paid to “The Star-Spangled Banner,” played and sung at every major sporting event. Now the national symbols, the flag and the song, remain at the center of controversy. And as the NFL season gets underway, sides are being drawn in a renewed battle over free speech and nonviolent resistance among legions of sports fans.

It might seem like Key is up past his historical bedtime. But the backstory and crosscurrents of the anthem are as unresolved as the NFL player challenges still likely to come on game days.

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